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Has Danny Meyer Found the Next Home for Union Square Café?

Has Danny Meyer Found the Next Home for Union Square Café?


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Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group has filed for two liquor licenses at 7 Bryant Park

Could this be the next home of Danny Meyer's Union Square Café?

Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group looks to be opening a new project at 7 Bryant Park, the 30-story building that is currently under construction in New York City, though formal details have yet to be released.

USHG recently filed for two liquor licenses, including one for an additional bar for the premises, located at 1045 Avenue of the Americas.

Details are scarce, but the space, formerly the Milliken Building, does include a “ground floor programmed for a high-end restaurant,” according to Real Estate Week.

Outlets have already begun to speculate that 7 Bryant Park may be the next home of the beloved Union Square Café, which lost the lease for its iconic home of the past three decades this year, and must relocate by the end of next year.

In any case, we doubt that the future project inside 7 Bryant Park will be another Shake Shack, though yet another Shack is headed for New York City’s Herald Square.

For the latest food and drink updates, visit our Food News page.

Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.


What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.

Editor’s note: This article was first published in 2014. Although we cannot guarantee all the restaurants mentioned are offering exactly the same dishes, we believe this will provide guidance in estimating calorie counts when eating out.

The nation’s largest restaurant chains have made a big deal in recent years about introducing smaller portion sizes. McDonald’s eliminated the Supersize menu, while T.G.I. Fridays and others have introduced small-plate items. Yet the restaurants have also been doing something else, with less fanfare: continuing to add dishes so rich that a single meal often contains a full day’s worth of calories.

Here, we show you what roughly 2,000 calories looks like at some large chains. (Depending on age and gender, most adults should eat between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day.) Researchers have long understood that people are more likely to finish what’s on their plate than to stop eating because they’ve consumed a given amount of food. It’s “the completion compulsion,” a phrase coined in the 1950s by the psychologist Paul S. Siegel. Combine that compulsion with the rising number of restaurant meals Americans eat and the substance of those meals, and you start to understand why we’ve put on so much weight. But there is some good news: As you’ll see below, it’s not so hard to eat bountifully and stay under 2,000 calories. It’s just hard to do so at most restaurants.



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