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Heirloom Tomato Salad with Pickled Fennel

Heirloom Tomato Salad with Pickled Fennel


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The flavor of the spiced pickled fennel really pops with the sweet tomatoes.

Ingredients

Pickled fennel

  • ¼ lemongrass stalk, tough outer layer removed, crushed
  • Zest of ¼ orange, removed with a vegetable peeler
  • 1 medium fennel bulb, cored, thinly sliced
  • 1½ cups unseasoned rice vinegar

Assembly

  • 2 lb. large heirloom tomatoes (about 3), cut into wedges
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, preferably heirloom, halved
  • 2 Tbsp. white balsamic or Sherry vinegar
  • 7 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 Cubanelle peppers or Anaheim chiles, sliced into ¾” rings, seeded
  • Fennel fronds (for serving)

Recipe Preparation

Pickled fennel

  • Toast star anise, aniseed, coriander seeds, fennel seeds, and cumin seeds in a small skillet over medium-low heat, stirring often, until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Bundle toasted spices, lemongrass, and orange zest in a piece of cheesecloth and tie with kitchen twine to make a sachet. Place sachet and fennel in a 1-qt. jar or bowl.

  • Bring vinegar, sugar, salt, and ½ cup water to a boil in a medium saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar and salt. Pour vinegar mixture over sachet and fennel and let cool; discard sachet. Cover fennel and chill at least 12 hours.

  • DO AHEAD: Pickled fennel can be made 2 weeks ahead. Keep chilled.

Assembly

  • Combine large and cherry tomatoes, vinegar, and 6 Tbsp. oil in a medium bowl; season with salt and pepper. Let sit at room temperature 30 minutes.

  • Before serving, heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium skillet over high heat. Cook Cubanelle peppers, tossing often, until charred in spots, about 4 minutes.

  • Serve tomato salad topped with peppers, pickled fennel, and fennel fronds.

Recipe by Michael Anthony,

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 240 Fat (g) 17 Saturated Fat (g) 2.5 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 24 Dietary Fiber (g) 4 Total Sugars (g) 18 Protein (g) 2 Sodium (mg) 190Reviews Section

Here's How to Make the Top 3 Dishes From the Campbell's® Soup Quickfire Challenge

On Bravo's Top Chef, three cheftestants used a pantry staple to create the most elevated vinaigrette, spicy tomato sauce, mushroom stroganoff, and more.

On the April 22 episode of Bravo's Top Chef, the cheftestants were tasked with a Quickfire challenge to create a dish that invoked a food memory. To put a sophisticated twist on those dishes, they were given access to a notable pantry staple.

"We want you to elevate [your food memory] and we want you to do it using Campbell's ® soup," host Padma Lakshmi explained as she showed a pantry stocked with Campbell’s ® Cream of Mushroom Soup, Campbell’s ® Cream of Chicken Soup, and Campbell’s ® Tomato Soup. "Whether it's a family dinner or even last season's holiday meal, take us back to that special place."

However, Padma warned, "We don't want to see just classic casseroles and pot pies."

While many of the dishes impressed the judges, three in particular especially stood out. Gabe Erales' charred cabbage-wrapped cod braised in spicy tomato sauce with charred fennel salad had "a depth of flavor that made this dish feel longer than a 30 minute cook time," guest judge Dale Talde declared. After tasting Sara Hauman's smoked mushroom stroganoff and Spaetzle, Padma raved, "I really love that you made your own Spaetzle with 30 minutes."

Chris Viaud created a grilled cheese panzanella, tomato soup vinaigrette, and pickled shallot that ultimately won the challenge. "Your use of the tomato soup in the vinaigrette, I thought, was a really fun twist and play on grilled cheese and tomato soup," Dale explained after calling the dish "imaginative [and] modern."

In an interview during the episode, Chris declared with a grin, "I won with making a grilled cheese!"

To get behind-the-scenes information about the Quickfire challenge and more, check out the video below and keep scrolling for a step-by-step guide to making Chris, Sara, and Gabe's recipes!


Heirloom Tomato Salad

I love browsing farmer’s markets and while in Austin or Chicago we always visit their local markets. I have a hard time finding one around me that I feel is a real farmer’s market where they bring in their own foods.

Don’t you just love picking up fresh tomatoes at a farmer’s market or road side stand and smelling them. I do, and there’s nothing better than a tomato you pick from your own vines.

It’s hard to believe there are so many varieties of tomatoes and the colors are almost rainbow like. My favorite tomato would have to be a fried green tomato with a crunchy cornmeal coating. Remember when cherry tomatoes were first around and they were so cute to put in things. Then came the grape tomato that is so sweet you feel like you are eating candy and now you can find all shapes and colors.

I happened to pick up these little heirloom tomatoes one day at the store and loved being able to eat the green ones along with the other colors and what a pretty salad they made.

This would make a great salad/side dish for any summer get together and I just bet you used some kind of tomato in your 4th side dishes.

I don’t know why the tomato is considered a fruit but it is and according to most sources they should be kept at room temperature instead of the refrigerator. I happen to like my tomatoes cold so I always keep mine in the refrigerator. If I keep them at room temperature then they keep ripening and get too ripe before I want to eat them.

I love the ingredients in this little salad.

Aren’t these tomatoes beautiful and I love the tartness of the green ones.

Slice the tomatoes in half and add the garlic, basil and salt and pepper to taste.

Slice the red onions into very thin slivers.

Add the onions to the tomato mix.

Add in the blue cheese and toss with the dressing. I think feta cheese would be a good substitution if you don’t care for blue cheese.


What can you substitute in this recipe?

What we’ve learned very well during the last year is “the perfect is the enemy of the good enough.” Don’t let the lack of a specific ingredient get in the way of you making this. So it is important to be able to use what you have in your pantry. If you need to substitute, here are some ideas for you. All of these are my best guesses.

–Raisins instead of currants
–Orange juice instead of tangerine juice
–Garlic powder and ground ginger instead of fresh (it will taste different with the ground versions, but if it means you get to make this, then do it.
–I think you could omit the chives and use a finely chopped shallot
–An orange instead of the tangerine segments
–Castelvetrano olives instead of Kalamata or other varieties. Basically, you want something more pungent and flavorful than a typical canned ripe black olive
–Whatever shape pasta you have. You could cook a long pasta like linguine, but I really prefer a shorter pasta for this recipe. Suit yourself! Do you have elbows, bowties, gemelli, rotini? Use what you like.
–Whatever greens you like! You could also wilt some spinach or chard and use that as the base of this dish.
–If pine nuts are not available or too pricey, try toasted slivered almonds or hazelnuts, or whatever you have around.

Now, who’s ready for Pasta with Fresh Tomatoes and Tangerines, Fennel, Currants and Olives? How pretty is this close-up!


Heirloom Tomato Salad with Pickled Fennel - Recipes

Heirloom Tomato Salad w/ Buttermilk Dressing
Adapted from Bon Appetit, September 2010 serves 4

okay. one thing I will say about this salad, aside from the fact that I adored it, is that the blue cheese can come or go. if you're big in to blue cheese, you may like it. if you're not, you may think it's waaaaay too much. I like blue cheese, but I preferred the salad with just the dressing, and no cheese.

time commitment: 30 minutes

ingredients
dressing
1/2 c mayonnaise
1/3 c buttermilk
2 T finely chopped fresh Italian parsley
1 1/2 T fresh lemon juice
1 1/2 T minced shallot
1 small garlic clove, minced
kosher salt and pepper

salad
3 slices of white bread, cut into 1 inch cubes (optional)
2 1/2 lbs heirloom tomatoes (various shapes and colors), cored, & cut into 3/4-inch-thick wedges (I used a pineapple corer but you could also just cut the core out with a knife)
1/2 c thinly sliced shallots
2 T evoo
1 T fresh lemon juice
kosher salt
1/2 c crumbled blue cheese (optional)
2 green onions, thinly sliced diagonally
2 T fresh Italian parsley leaves

instructions
Preheat oven to 350 F. Whisk first 6 ingredients in small bowl. Season dressing with coarse salt and freshly ground pepper.

Toss bread cubes onto a baking sheet and bake for

10 minutes. Remove and let cool.

Place tomatoes and shallots in large bowl. Add oil and lemon juice sprinkle with coarse salt and freshly ground pepper and toss. Divide among 4 plates. Drizzle with dressing. Sprinkle with blue cheese, if using, as well as green onions, and parsley. If you want a crunch to your salad, divide the croutons among the 4 plates (for leftovers, keep the croutons separate from the salad until eating.).


Hanover’s Heirlooms

When it comes to tomatoes, ignore appearances it’s what’s inside that counts.

Simple cherry tomato salad

Photography by Tyler Darden.Tomatoes provided by Manakintowne Specialty Growers (Manakintowne.com), ShireFolk Farm (ShireFolkFarm.com), and Village Garden RVA (YourVillageGarden.com).

Virginians are justifiably proud of the Hanover tomato, but not for the reason that many think. “Hanover” refers not to a particular variety, but to any tomato grown in the area. A bona fide Hanover tomato can be anything from a tiny yellow Aunt Molly’s Ground Cherry to a bright red one-pound Mortgage Lifter. In fact, great Virginia tomatoes don’t even need to come from Hanover.

“Tomatoes need nutrients and good drainage,” explains David Hunsaker, who grows more than 200 types of heirloom tomatoes at Village Garden RVA in Hanover County. “There are certain areas of Hanover that have sandy soil from basically being under the sea. Red clay is nutrient rich, and you have compost from eons of trees growing and dropping leaves and branches. That sandy soil mix is perfectly suited for a tomato.”

Heirloom varieties, in particular, thrive in Hanover soil. Heirlooms grow from seeds that have been saved for generations. Unlike hybrid varieties, heirloom plants are tall and rangy, and they fruit all summer long. They’re delicate and susceptible to disease, producing fruit that bruises easily. Heirloom tomatoes are often lumpy, mottled, and downright ugly. But the flavor!

“They all look and taste different,” says Trevor Knotts, corporate chef for Richmond Restaurant Group. “You can taste the sunshine on them. Some are sweeter, some have a little more acid, some are grassier. I’ve had one that tasted just like Lucky Charms cereal. It’s crazy.”

When Knotts creates tomato recipes, he always seeks out local heirlooms. “You’re not going to get totally perfect and uniform,” he says. “I just embrace the fact that it’s a unique, real product. They aren’t cookie-cutter tomatoes.”

In a good tomato season, Virginians can find heirlooms at the market from mid-June through early October. Knotts advises treating them simply. “I wouldn’t puree them to make a sauce, just like I wouldn’t use a 20-year aged balsamic to make a vinaigrette,” Knotts says. “It’s your special ingredient that you let shine.”

Here, Knotts shares some of his recipes for featuring Virginia’s heirloom tomatoes.

Simple Cherry Tomato Salad

When various fresh tomatoes are in season, the best way to enjoy them is to keep it simple. This is the type of relaxed, instinctive dish one would toss together at the end of a gorgeous summer day to enjoy al fresco.

2 cups assorted cherry and pear tomatoes, whole or halved

vinaigrette dressing of choice

4 ounces shaved coppa or other hard cured meat, such as prosciutto or bresaola

4 2-ounce knobs of burrata cheese

Bring the vinegar to a simmer over medium-high heat. Lower heat and simmer until reduced, about 15 minutes. Toss the tomatoes with the vinaigrette. Divide the tomatoes equally among four shallow bowls or salad plates. Center 1 ounce of meat and a knob of burrata on each salad. Dot with balsamic reduction and top with snipped herbs like basil, chives, marjoram, or oregano.

Tomato Jam


17 Reasons to Cook With More Fennel

Farideh Sadeghin

Recognized for its subtly sweet flavor reminiscent of licorice and anise, fennel is absolutely delicious. It’s also an incredibly versatile vegetable, with every part—crunchy bulb, fibrous stalk, feathery fronds, flavorful seeds, and even the pollen—is edible and great in any fennel recipes. Rich, hearty steaks get an earthy boost from this herb. A bit of fennel goes a long way in perfuming soups. And to use the rest of the bunch, incorporate pickled fennel recipes to give a tangy edge to meatier dishes. Soups, salads, sandwiches, and more—we’ve rounded up our favorite fennel recipes.

Fennel and Citrus Salad with Charred Squid

Fennel and Citrus Salad with Charred Squid

Cream of Fennel Soup

This rich, smooth soup balances the gentle flavor of fennel with spices and a bracing addition of Pernod. Get the recipe for Cream of Fennel Soup »

Giant Fennel-Chile-Rubbed Steak

This T-bone steak is grilled with a simple rub of ground fennel seeds, black peppercorns, and red chile flakes. Get the recipe for Giant Fennel-Chile-Rubbed Steak »

Seared Octopus with Fennel Pollen and Smoked Paprika

When making this elegant seafood appetizer from Franklin restaurant in Tasmania, make sure you wash the octopus thoroughly to remove any grit. Get the recipe for Seared Octopus with Fennel Pollen and Smoked Paprika »

Get the recipe for Shaved Fennel and Grilled Corn Salad »

A base of crunchy, fresh fennel contrasts perfectly with grilled corn kernels and crumbled feta cheese in this summer salad.

Onion Fennel and Mushroom Soup

Onion Fennel and Mushroom Soup

Spaghetti with Oven-Roasted Tomatoes and Caramelized Fennel

We like to serve this pasta topped with a little shaved bottarga, the dried salted roe of tuna or gray mullet a sprinkle adds a briny, salty note that beautifully offsets sweet, oven roasted plum tomatoes. Get the recipe for Spaghetti with Oven-Roasted Tomatoes and Caramelized Fennel »

Fennel Oil

Kyle Itani of Itani Ramen uses this delicate, anise-scented oil to top off his home-style chicken ramen. Get the recipe for Fennel Oil »

Arugula, Radicchio, and Fennel Salad

Walnuts and parmesan add richness to this crunchy salad from The Yellow Table’s Anna Watson Carl. Get the recipe for Arugula, Radicchio, and Fennel Salad »

Tomato and Cucumber Salad With Fennel Dressing

Tomatoes and cucumbers are a classic combination. Here, Eli Sussman of the Sussman Brothers modernizes the summer staple with heirloom varieties of the titular ingredients and brings them together with a caramelized fennel–lemon dressing. Get the recipe for Tomato and Cucumber Salad With Fennel Dressing »

Israeli Cous Cous With Ras El Hanout, Fennel, and Carrot

Ras el hanout, the North African spice blend, along with fresh orange zest and juice, mint, and cilantro, give Israeli cous cous a fresh feel and flavor in this simple weeknight meal. Get the recipe for Israeli Cous Cous With Ras El Hanout, Fennel, and Carrot »

Sprouted Seed and Grain Salad with Spiced Prawns

Sprouted Seed and Grain Salad with Spiced Prawns

Grouper in Crab Sauce with Black Quinoa and Pickled Fennel

Meaty butter-basted grouper fillets are topped with a butter-rich, citrusy crab sauce and served over wilted kale and quinoa. Pickled fennel adds a dose of herby flavor that brings the dish together. Get the recipe for Grouper in Crab Sauce with Black Quinoa and Pickled Fennel »

Warm Wheat Berry Salad with Fava Beans and Trout Roe

This warm salad, from Elise Kornack of the Brooklyn restaurant Take Root, is a satisfying main course thanks to chewy, protein-packed wheat berries topped with fennel. Get the recipe for Warm Wheat Berry Salad with Fava Beans and Trout Roe »

Grilled Skirt Steak with Herb Salad

This steak is seasoned simply with salt and pepper and served with a light herb salad with a whole grain mustard and honey dressing. Get the recipe for Grilled Skirt Steak with Herb Salad »

Open-Faced Rye, Poached Red Snapper, Pickled Radish, and Salsa Verde Sandwich

Open Faced Rye, Poached Red Snapper, Pickled Radish, and Salsa Verde Sandwich, Tasmania

10 Delicious Soups and Salads

Green Goddess dressing &mdash a mix of mayonnaise, sour cream, herbs, anchovies, and lemon &mdash was created at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco in the 1920s, as a tribute to an actor starring in a play called The Green Goddess. The creamy dressing is typically tossed with a green salad, but it's also addictive in Melissa Rubel's chicken salad, made with a rotisserie bird.

Supersweet tomatoes will make this cold soup extra-delicious. But to enhance the flavor of even less-than-perfect produce, Melissa Rubel adds tomato paste, which has a rich, concentrated taste.

Sweet-tasting lump crab is sold precooked, so it's perfect for a fast meal. Melissa Rubel uses it here in a crunchy salad that gets a double dose of nutty flavor from walnuts and walnut oil.

Green Zebras are heirloom tomatoes with a striped pattern they are sweet like red tomatoes but give this gazpacho a lovely jade hue. To make the chilled soup extra tangy, use tomatillos or unripe red tomatoes instead of Green Zebras.

Melissa Rubel uses a store-bought rotisserie bird in her reinvented chicken salad. She spikes the mayonnaise with chile sauce and toasted sesame oil and adds water chestnuts for crunch.

Rosita Missoni loves pan-frying scamorza, a firm Italian cow's-milk cheese, to give it an irresistible crust. Provolone would also work. Dotted with sun-dried tomato and arugula pesto, this cheese-topped salad is full of robust Italian flavors.

Peter Ting's soothing, mellow soup gets a refreshing tang from a swirl of crème fraîche. It is terrific served hot or cold.

Bulgur (a quick-cooking form of whole wheat) is usually boiled before it's eaten, but for this terrific main-course salad, it's simply softened in warm tap water before being tossed with baby spinach and precooked shrimp.

Pepperoncini (long, thin Italian pickled chiles) give Marcia Kiesel's otherwise-mild soup an appealingly tangy flavor.

This elegant, crunchy salad includes vitamin-and-mineral-packed beets, turnips, and fennel, plus protein-rich eggs. Barbara Lynch tosses the shaved vegetables with vinegar and olive oil until they're slightly pickled.


Salads for BBQ recipes

A fresh salad makes the perfect barbecue side dish. Furnish your salad with creamy potato, refreshing watermelon, tasty halloumi, beans, squash and more.

New potato & frisée salad

A prepare-ahead salad ideal for weekend entertaining

Charred baby aubergine & toasted quinoa salad

A fresh summer salad that won't leave the veggies feeling left out come barbecue season. Grilled vegetables, herbs, quinoa and crunchy hazelnuts give a variety of gorgeous textures and flavours


9 Tomato Recipes

Talk to a tomato lover about high tomato season, when the sun&rsquos fully saturated each fruit and you can smell the ripeness coming off the skin from two feet away, and prepare for a lull in the conversation: for a moment, the tomato lover can&rsquot even remember where they are, or who they&rsquore talking to. They&rsquore lost in tomatoland.

As much as we all like to imagine ourselves in next to a pool filled with tomatoes, diving in, there is some virtue to actually using them in cooking. And in our August issue, chef Michael Anthony from NYC&rsquos Gramercy Tavern came up with amazing ways to use tomatoes, from simply poaching them in garlicky oil to using sweet little Sun Golds to make a warm, spicy sauce. Tomatoland&rsquos calling.

Green Panzanella with Pickled Shallot

We love the shades of green you get from using one color of heirlooms, but this salad is equally delicious with any tomatoes you like.

Ingredients
Tomatoes and Pickled Shallot
1 large shallot, thinly sliced
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
3 1/2 pounds assorted ripe green heirloom tomatoes (such as Green Zebras), cut into wedges
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Croutons and Assembly
4 cups torn 1 1/2-inch pieces white country bread, with crusts (about 1/2 of a 1-pound loaf)
2 garlic cloves, lightly crushed
3 tablespoons olive oil
7 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
2 cups arugula, thick stems trimmed
Tomatoes and Pickled Shallot
Combine shallot and vinegar in a small bowl season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Let stand 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, place tomatoes on a large rimmed baking sheet season with salt and let stand 15 minutes.
Transfer 2 tablespoons vinegar from shallot mixture to a large bowl (reserve remaining vinegar with shallots). Whisking constantly, gradually add oil whisk until combined. Season dressing with salt, pepper, and more vinegar from shallot mixture, if desired.
Add tomatoes and their juices to dressing and gently toss to coat. Let tomato mixture stand at room temperature until tomatoes release more juices and soften slightly, about 1 hour.
Croutons and Assembly
Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°. Combine bread and garlic on a large rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with oil season with salt and pepper. Squeeze bread pieces lightly with your hands so they will evenly absorb oil and spread out in a single layer.
Bake bread pieces, tossing occasionally, until crisp on the outside but still chewy in the center, 10&ndash15 minutes. Let croutons cool slightly, then discard garlic.
Add arugula and croutons to bowl with tomato mixture season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Drain pickled shallot. Serve panzanella topped with pickled shallot.

Spaghetti with Sun Gold Tomato Sauce

Warm spices, supersweet Sun Gold tomatoes, and a short cooking time reinvent the ordinary marinara.

Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 sprigs basil
1 sprig thyme
1/2 sprig tarragon
1 whole star anise pod
1 whole clove
4 cups Sun Gold or cherry tomatoes, halved
2 teaspoons Sherry or red wine vinegar
tablespoons Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
12 ounces spaghetti

Preparation
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring often, until soft but not brown, 6&ndash8 minutes. Add garlic, basil, thyme, and tarragon sprigs, star anise, and clove, and cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes and vinegar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes release their juices and a sauce forms, 10&ndash15 minutes. Discard thyme, tarragon, and basil sprigs, star anise, and clove. Season sauce with salt and pepper.
Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente. Drain, reserving 1 cup pasta cooking liquid.
Add pasta and 1/2 cup pasta cooking liquid to sauce in skillet. Cook, tossing and adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta, about 2 minutes.

DO AHEAD: Sauce can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. Reheat before tossing with spaghetti.

Chilled Tomato and Stone Fruit Soup
This riff on gazpacho gets unexpected sweetness&mdashand great color&mdashfrom the addition of cherries and a peach.


6 SERVINGS

Ingredients

2 pounds beefsteak tomatoes (about 4), quartered
1 large English hothouse cucumber, peeled, seeded, cut into pieces
1 large ripe peach, peeled, halved
1/2 jalapeño, seeded (or with seeds for a spicier soup), chopped
1/2 garlic clove
1 cup fresh (or frozen, thawed) cherries (about 8 ounces), pitted
2 tablespoons (or more) white balsamic or Sherry vinegar
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil plus more
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt plus more
Freshly ground black pepper
Flaky sea salt (such as Maldon)
Pulse tomatoes in a blender until finely chopped and transfer to a large bowl. Pulse cucumber, peach, jalapeño, garlic, and cherries in blender until finely chopped and add to bowl with tomatoes. Mix in vinegar, 1/4 cup oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, and 1 cup cold water season with pepper. Cover and let sit at room temperature 1 hour, or chill at least 12 hours.
Season soup with kosher salt, pepper, and more oil and vinegar, if desired. Serve soup drizzled with oil and seasoned with sea salt and pepper.

DO AHEAD: Soup can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.

Heirloom Tomato Salad with Pickled Fennel
The flavor of the spiced pickled fennel really pops with the sweet tomatoes.

Ingredients

Pickled Fennel
1 whole star anise pod
1 teaspoon aniseed
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/4 lemongrass stalk, tough outer layer removed, crushed
Zest of 1/4 orange, removed with a vegetable peeler
1 medium fennel bulb, cored, thinly sliced
1 1/2 cups unseasoned rice vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons kosher salt
Assembly

2 pounds large heirloom tomatoes (about 3), cut into wedges
1 cup cherry tomatoes, preferably heirloom, halved
2 tablespoons white balsamic or Sherry vinegar
7 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
Cubanelle peppers or Anaheim Chiles, sliced into 3/4-inch rings, seeded
Fennel fronds (for serving)
Special Equipment

Pickled Fennel

Toast star anise, aniseed, coriander seeds, fennel seeds, and cumin seeds in a small skillet over medium-low heat, stirring often, until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Bundle toasted spices, lemongrass, and orange zest in a piece of cheesecloth and tie with kitchen twine to make a sachet. Place sachet and fennel in a 1-quart jar or bowl.

Bring vinegar, sugar, salt, and 1/2 cup water to a boil in a medium saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar and salt. Pour vinegar mixture over sachet and fennel and let cool discard sachet. Cover fennel and chill at least 12 hours.

DO AHEAD: Pickled fennel can be made 2 weeks ahead. Keep chilled.

Combine large and cherry tomatoes, vinegar, and 6 Tbsp. oil in a medium bowl season with salt and pepper. Let sit at room temperature 30 minutes.

Before serving, heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a medium skillet over high heat. Cook Cubanelle peppers, tossing often, until charred in spots, about 4 minutes. Serve tomato salad topped with peppers, pickled fennel, and fennel fronds.

Halibut with Tomato-Cherry Vinaigrette

Fluke, hake, or cod are all good substitutions for the halibut.

Ingredients

Tomato-Cherry Vinaigrette
1 small sprig basil
1/2 pound tomatoes (such as beefsteak or cherry), coarsely chopped
1/4 cup fresh sweet (or frozen, thawed) cherries, pitted
1/4 cup fresh sour cherries, pitted, or sour cherries in light syrup from a jar, drained
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
1/2 teaspoon (or more) sugar
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt plus more
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Halibut
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil plus more for drizzling
4 6-ounce halibut fillets
Preparation

Tomato-Cherry Vinaigrette
Combine basil, tomatoes, sweet and sour cherries, vinegar, shallot, sugar, and 1/8 tsp. salt in a large bowl cover and let sit at room temperature for 1&ndash2 hours.
Remove basil sprig. Purée tomato mixture in a blender until smooth strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a small bowl, whisk in oil, and season with salt.

Halibut
Season halibut with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large nonstick pan over medium-high heat. Cook halibut until golden brown and just opaque in the center, about 4 minutes per side.
Serve halibut with tomato-cherry vinaigrette, drizzled with oil.
DO AHEAD: Vinaigrette can be made one day ahead. Cover and chill.

Oil-Poached Tomatoes

Ingredients
1 pound plum tomatoes (about 6), halved, cored
1 head of garlic, cloves separated
2 sprigs rosemary
2 sprigs thyme
1 cup olive oil
1 teaspoon kosher salt
Preheat oven to 300°. Toss tomatoes, garlic, rosemary and thyme sprigs, oil, and salt in a large baking dish.
Bake tomatoes until they are soft and skins begin to shrivel, 35&ndash45 minutes. Let cool slightly, then slip off skins. Discard herbs.

DO AHEAD: Tomatoes can be made 5 days ahead. Cover tomatoes and oil and chill.

Tomato Risotto
Finishing this risotto with Tomato Water in place of stock gives it a pure, bright tomato flavor.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
1 1/2 cups arborio rice
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 cup Tomato Water (click recipe)
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan plus more for serving
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
6 Oil-Poached Tomato halves, coarsely chopped (click recipe)
Bring 6 cups water to a boil over medium heat remove from heat, cover and keep warm.
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat add onion and cook, stirring often, until soft, about 5 minutes. Add rice and cook, stirring constantly, 2 minutes. Add wine and cook, stirring constantly, until evaporated, about 1 minute. Add 1/2 cup water and cook, stirring often, until water is absorbed.
Continue adding water by 1/2-cupfuls, stirring often, until rice is tender but still firm to the bite, 20&ndash25 minutes. (You may not need all the water).
Mix in Tomato Water, butter, and 2 tablespoons Parmesan season with salt and pepper. Simmer, stirring often, until liquid is mostly absorbed, about 2 minutes. Mix in Oil-Poached Tomatoes.
Serve risotto topped with more Parmesan.


Watch the video: Jamies Ultimate Tomato Salad


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