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7 Prohibition-Era Cocktails for Repeal Day

7 Prohibition-Era Cocktails for Repeal Day


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Toast the anniversary of Repeal Day with classic cocktails

iStock / Sanny11

Drink like Prohibition has just been repealed!

The history of Prohibition has fascinated cocktail and spirits lovers for decades; now, on the 84th anniversary of Repeal Day (Dec. 5), the tradition of classic cocktails still lives on.

Click here for 7 Prohibition-Era Cocktails for Repeal Day Slideshow

Some of the most traditional drinks we drink today were born during the supposedly "dry" era of America's history. Take the Sazerac: it's been called the first original cocktail, and rightfully so. Using his homemade bitters, Antoine Amedie Peychaud added the Peychaud's bitters to a brandy toddy and birthed a movement that defines the New Orleans cocktail scene.

Then there's the Clover Club, from Philadelphia's now-closed eponymous bar. The egg cocktail has garnered more and more fans since its early days, including at New York City's most famous watering hole, the Pegu Club.

There's no better way to toast the forefathers who repealed Prohibition than with a drink made by them. Click here to find 7 Prohibition-era cocktails, recipes that will last through the ages.


10 Amazing Facts You Should Know About The Prohibition Era

Did you know that exactly a century ago, following the first World War, alcohol was banned across the United States? That’s right, according to the 18 th amendment to the US Constitution, the production, import, transport, and sale of alcohol was not allowed from 1920 to 1933. This gave rise to what is now called the Prohibition Era.

Why would someone want to ban alcohol? Well, it was mainly due to the social stigma attached to it. It was also believed to be the cause of all the problems prevalent in society at that time, such as domestic violence, alcoholism, and corruption. There was also an increase in bootlegging, illegal drinking spots, criminal activity and gang wars, and the Prohibition act gained huge support to re-establish morality in society.

Here are some incredible facts you didn’t know about Prohibition.

1. This wasn’t the first time Prohibition was imposed

A century before Prohibition, in the 1820s and the 1830s, there were calls for movements such as the abolitionist movement and the end of slavery. During such times, the United States called for increased temperance and was looking for religious revivalism. For example, 1838 saw the ban of spirits in quantities less than 15 gallons in Massachusetts. The state of Maine passed the law in 1846. Women were particularly against the sale of alcohol, as they believed it to a family destroyer.

In 1906, the Anti-Saloon league demanded a ban on liquor. Factory owners supported the move to reduce alcohol consumption among their employees, resulting in higher productivity and reduced accidents in their factories.

2. “Drinking” alcohol was still legal

While it was illegal to transport, manufacture, sell or import alcohol, consumption of the stock from 1920 was allowed in the comfort of one’s home. The bottles did run out very quickly for most people as thirteen years is a really long time but provided solace for some time to those who had stockpiled bottles.

Many of today’s popular cocktails owe their origins to the Prohibition Era

3. Prohibition gave rise to innovative cocktails

As the legal trade and selling of alcohol were banned, a lot of illegal activity was happening around it. People still had access to liquor, but because of the risk involved, the quality was substandard and illegal traders could not source good alcohol.

This led to innovation to make the alcohol more drinkable and gave rise to some of the most popular cocktails of today, such as Sidecar, Tom Collins, Mary Pickford, etc. A lot of bartenders who were out of jobs due to the ban moved to Mexico and learnt new cocktails, which they later came back and popularised in the US.

4. Prohibition has been the only US constitution amendment ever to be repealed

By the end of 1920s, temperance had been re-established to some effect. The consumption of liquor had decreased, but not stopped. Bootlegging of liquor affected the poor in ways worse than it did the middle and upper classes.

People were out of jobs during the Great Depression in 1932. Legalizing liquor would mean giving jobs to thousands of people across the country. Franklin D. Roosevelt came into power and repealed the Prohibition act with majority support from the Congress. The repeal of the act was the 21st amendment to the US constitution.

5. There were some states that did not implement the Prohibition

Alcohol ban meant a negative impact on the economy, as well as an additional cost on policing the ban. Some states were not ready to dedicate these extra resources and refused to implement the ban. One of the first states to do so was Maryland, and New York followed suit. New York repealed the ban in 1923.

A national ban was observed more than six years after its implementation in 1920, and that too is believed to not have taken effect in each corner of the country, with some states and cities having never implemented it.

File picture of seized alcohol being dumped (Pic Source)

6. Illegal low-quality liquor caused deaths in thousands

Over 10,000 people were victims of bootlegged liquor during the ban. Illegal producers produced low-quality gins and rum, with cheaper and difficult to source ingredients. Industrial alcohol was consumed by those that were desperate for a drink.

Prohibition had directed industries to make their alcohol undrinkable, and it required the addition of substances like methyl alcohol, quinine and other toxic chemicals. A lot of those who didn’t die ended up losing their eye-sight.

7. Prohibition’s end was brought about by Utah

Repeal of the 18th amendment required ratification from 36 states to bring about the 21st amendment. While the first state to do so was Michigan in April 1933, the last state to do so was Utah, which was the final nail in the coffin and brought about the end of Prohibition.

What’s fascinating is that Utah had never been very liberal in its outlook towards alcohol, but supported the repeal and finally ratified in December 1933.

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8. Consumption of alcohol actually decreased during Prohibition

While there were plenty of illegal ways to obtain alcohol, it was expensive and the quality was bad. This deterred a lot of people from drinking, especially the poor who couldn’t afford it.

Statistically, early Prohibition years led to a 70% decline in the drinking rate, which later dropped, but remained at 30% even after the repeal of the amendment.

Hard to believe but Prohibition still exists in some parts of the US (Pic source)

9. Supporters of Prohibition tried to rewrite the Bible and remove all alcohol references from it

A lot of staunch believers in the ill-effects of alcohol extended full support to the Prohibition. This led them to take extreme steps and they tried to rewrite the holy Bible by removing all the alcohol references from it.

This move was not successful as the Bible is followed the world over, not just in the United States.

10. Prohibition is still in effect today in some parts of the US

There are about 10 states in the country where some counties still swear by abstinence and liquor is banned. Although a few other states today are not “dry”, they did not end their prohibition right after the 21st amendment in 1933.

Mississippi finally lifted its ban in the year 1966, while Kansas saw its dry period up to 1948. Oklahoma ended its ban only in 1959.

Whether or not Prohibition was the right move, it brought about many changes in the drinking culture of the United States and by extension, the rest of the world. While there were some failures, there were some successes to the movement as well. Today, it is difficult to imagine life in the United States without alcohol and a new amendment to ban alcohol seems unlikely any time in the near future. We’ll drink to that.


Prohibition Food Trends and Tipples

Eighty years ago today, on December 5, 1933, the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution was repealed, marking the end of Prohibition. The amendment, which prohibited the production, transport, and sale of alcohol took effect on January 17, 1920 and was the only amendment in our country's history to ever be repealed. Thus, today became known by Americans as Repeal Day.

The truth was, while the ratification of the Twenty-First Amendment meant it was now legal to serve alcohol once again, during the Prohibition era, thousands of taverns, saloons, pubs, and taprooms in New York City, Chicago, and San Francisco &mdash among other cities &mdash continued to offer alcohol. These establishments became known as speakeasies, because a password needed to be spoken softly, or easy, usually in a small opening at a back door, before patrons could enter.

New York was a far cry from a dry town during those years. It was estimated by the New York Historical Society that anywhere from 20,000 to 300,000 (!) speakeasies operated in the Big Apple during Prohibition. Some were drab and dank, while others became famous for serving alcohol like the 300 Club, Charlie's "21", and the Stork Club. In this pre-Depression era, these clubs offered Gatsby-esque environs serving forward-thinking culinary delights. According to the "Enclyclopedia of American Food and Drink, "New York's '21' Club was a speakeasy during this period and had two bars, a dance floor, an orchestra, and dining rooms on two floors." The alcohol served at some of the higher-end speakeasies were well-crafted cocktails and fine wines.

Of course, moonshine, illicit distilled liquor, was being prepared behind closed doors in homes and commercially across the country. According to the Oxford Companion of American Food & Drink, "During Prohibition, moonshiners enjoyed a huge profit margin, making four gallons of whiskey for about $4 and selling them for about $160." However, it didn't have the same smokey taste as the whiskey in pre-Prohibition days, described by the Oxford Companion of American Food & Drink as "tasteless" and "harsh."

Quick-service restaurants cropped up as a result of the ban of alcohol. The Oxford Companion of American Food & Drink explains: "Prohibition in 1920 devastated fine-dining restaurants. Until then (as now) the business formula that made restaurants viable relied on a high profit margin on alcohol sales, but other types of restaurants flourished." The Prohibition era brought on the soda fountains and luncheonettes which often took residence in former fine dining restaurant spaces left behind. The leases were cheap and these eateries did not have a need to serve alcohol.

What will you do to celebrate the anniversary of Repeal Day?

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Celebrate With Some Prohibition-Era Cocktail Recipes

The month of December marks the 79th anniversary of the repeal of prohibition, and the era seems to be making a comeback in modern day culture as today’s fashion, cocktails, and hit TV shows and movies are inspired by a time of bootleggers, speakeasies and gangsters.

The newfound enthusiasm for Prohibition era gin and whiskey cocktails has spread across the US as dedicated bartenders are bringing back once-forgotten cocktails from the pre-prohibition era, resurrected from historic cocktail books and in some cases using painstakingly recreated tinctures, liqueurs and bitters.

Below are a few recipes of Prohibition-era cocktail recipes from one of the gins that was actually around in the 1920s – Tanqueray.

The Franklin

  • 1.5oz Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • 1 tbsp dry vermouth
  • 2 tbsp olive juice
  • 2 olives

Fill a mixer with all ingredients including the olives. Cover and shake hard 3 – 4 times. Strain contents of the mixer into the cocktail glass. Garnish with an olive.

The Franklin, a dirty martini, is the drink that brought it all back and the cocktail that FDR celebrated the repeal of Prohibition with.

Pour all of the ingredients into a shaker, fill with ice, shake and strain into a chilled a coupe glass.

Introduced in the late 20’s, The White Lady was born from a drink named “Delilah,” which included crème de menthe. The Savoy’s Harry Craddock replaced it with orange liqueur and it became an instant classic.

  • 1.5oz Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • 4oz ginger ale
  • .5 lemon juice
  • ½ of the shell of a lemon

Squeeze lemon or lime juice into a collins glass and add the juiced shell of the lemon. Add ice and the Tanqueray. Top with ginger ale.

A relatively forgotten drink from the 20’s, this classic gin cocktail offers a taste that’s refreshing and light.

Southside Fizz

  • 1.5oz Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • 3/4oz fresh lemon juice
  • 0.5oz simple syrup
  • 8–10 mint leaves
  • Club soda

Place mint leaves in cocktail shaker and gently bruise with muddler. Add gin, lemon juice and sugar, and stir to dissolve. Fill shaker with large pieces of ice and shake gently for 10 seconds. Double-strain into a highball glass filled with ice. Top with chilled club soda.

The Southside Fizz is the signature drink at the 21 Club, a historic and notorious speakeasy during Prohibition that still has the hidden secret passageway to the wine cellar under the adjoining building where all the illicit alcohol was hidden.


It's Prohibition Repeal Day! Now Go Out and Drink These Cocktails

Today marks the ratification of the 21st Amendment of the United States Constitution, and the end of America’s “noble experiment,” better known Prohibition. Exactly 84 years ago today, a lot of people were finally able to (legally) order an alcoholic drink.

We’ve marked the occasion by culling a menu of 14 classic Prohibition- and pre-Prohibition-era cocktails for you to mix up while you get in touch with your inner scofflaw. Some of these recipes have been slightly tweaked for modern times (for example, the classic whisky highball has been updated to include Suntory Toki and is mixed in the Japanese style), and there’s still debate about exactly when some of these drinks were first developed (Hemingway’s daiquiri variation was probably invented in the 󈧶s, though he turned 21 when Prohibition was repealed), but nevertheless, what are you waiting for? Put on your finest vest, slip on a pair of sleeve garters and dust off that pork-pie hat. It’s time to get mixing.

For a few people, this not-too-boozy martini variation is easy to mix in bulk so your guests only have to pour once. For a larger group, mix up a batch the night before, funnel into bottles and set in the freezer for a perfectly chilled, slightly viscous pour. When guests arrive, set the bottles in a bowl of ice, and add an array of bitters and garnishes (lemon peels, orange peels, olives and caperberries are popular options) for a DIY martini station.

In an ice-filled mixing glass, combine the gin and vermouth. Stir well, and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with the olive before serving.

The New York Flip is just one member of an entire class of classic cocktails called flips. Though there are historical claims of flips being created as far back as the 1600s, modern understanding of the drink stems—as do a vast number of cocktails we enjoy today—from Jerry Thomas’ seminal 1862 bar bible, How to Mix Drinks: or, The Bon-Vivant’s Companion.

By itself, a flip just means a cocktail made with egg and sugar, but traditionally without cream (differentiating it from an eggnog). What sets a flip apart from other egg cocktails is that the whole egg is used, yolk included. Many classic recipes even call for twice as much egg yolk as egg white. The word “flip” itself comes from the old practice of pouring the egged mix back and forth rapidly between jugs to froth the cocktail and smoothen out the drink.

The tawny Port acts as the primary sweetening agent in the New York Flip, bolstered with just a small amount of simple syrup. And because New Yorkers have to be brash, their signature version of the flip has also come to include the addition of cream and egg yolk without the white. Swap the heavy cream with buttermilk for a nice variation that has less fat but a touch more acid, to counter the richness of the drink.

Though it falls more in line with the nog family, however you choose to prepare it, keep this classic recipe in your pocket for a perfect after-dinner drink.

  • 1 ½ ounces Bourbon
  • ¾ ounce tawny Port
  • ¼ ounce simple syrup
  • ¾ ounce heavy cream or buttermilk
  • 1 egg yolk
  • Nutmeg, for garnish

Combine all ingredients except for garnish in a cocktail shaker. Dry shake (vigorously and without ice) for at least 20 seconds, or until egg is fully beaten and incorporated into the drink. Add ice and shake again for an additional 10–15 seconds to chill. Strain into a sherry glass, coupe or martini glass and grate fresh nutmeg over the top. Serve up.

“I don’t want to say it’s the most famous Irish whiskey cocktail, but it’s probably our most famous classic,” says Herlihy. The story behind this elegant drink, which first appeared in Hugo R. Ensslin’s 1917 book, Recipes for Mixed Drinks, is that a guest walked in, asked for a drink, and was humming the song “It’s a Long Road to Tipperary,” which was an anthem for homesick Irish soldiers in the British army during World War I. Of course, a drink named for Tipperary, a county in Ireland, would feature Irish whiskey.

Recipe courtesy Sean Muldoon, founder/general manager, The Dead Rabbit, New York City

  • 1½ ounces Michael Collins Single Malt Irish Whiskey
  • 1 ounce sweet vermouth
  • ½ ounce green Chartreuse
  • ½ ounce chilled water
  • 2 dashes orange bitters
  • ½ teaspoon cane sugar syrup
  • Orange twist, for garnish

In a mixing glass, stir together all ingredients (except garnish) with ice. Strain into a martini glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

When it comes to classic gin cocktails, few are as revered by bartenders as the Aviation. On the other hand, even fewer are reviled like a poorly made Aviation.

The drink is built on a delicate balance of strongly flavored ingredients, which can easily cause ruin when out of proportion. But done right, you’re guaranteed to convert anybody who claims they “don’t like gin.”

The first printed mention of the Aviation on record is in Hugo R. Ensslin’s 1917 classic compendium, Recipes for Mixed Drinks. A variation on the gin sour, the Aviation replaces simple syrup with maraschino liqueur, balances it with lemon and introduces a wildcard, Crème Yvette.

Crème Yvette is a violet herbal liqueur—a proprietary blend modeled after the more generic crème de violette that was integral to the original Aviation. It provides the Aviation’s distinctive, sky-like blue/grey hue (the source of the drink’s name) and signature floral punch.

Bartenders are often split on preference of Crème Yvette, with its addition of berry, vanilla and spices, or the less-complex but more violet-forward crème de violette. Crème Yvette did become a hot commodity after production stopped in 1969 and options for a proper Aviation became limited, causing the drink to lose the public’s interest and fall out of sight.

In 2009, after 40 years, the long-sought ingredient was revived and the once-forgotten Aviation began to find a new audience.

With Yvette’s pungent blend of aromatic ingredients, a little goes a long way. One extra dash has been known to ruin the drink (a slightly heavier hand can be used with the less-sweet violette). If you follow this recipe, though, you’ll have made one of the cocktail world’s most perfect gin creations.

  • 2 ounces gin
  • ¾ ounce fresh lemon juice
  • ½ ounce maraschino liqueur
  • 1 bar spoon Crème Yvette (or crème de violette)
  • Maraschino cherry, for garnish

Add all ingredients except garnish to cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake vigorously until well chilled. Double-strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with maraschino cherry.


Tanqueray Gin Prohibition Era Cocktails

The Prohibition era seems to be making a comeback in modern day culture as today’s fashion, cocktails, and hit TV shows and movies are inspired by a time of bootleggers, speakeasies and gangsters. From the wildly successful HBO drama Boardwalk Empire, to the historically detailed Ken Burns documentary Prohibition, to celebrity-stacked movies such as Lawless and the anticipated release of The Great Gatsby, Hollywood is taking notice and capitalizing on this trend.

The newfound enthusiasm for Prohibition era gin and whiskey cocktails has spread across the country as dedicated bartenders are bringing back once-forgotten cocktails from the pre-prohibition era, resurrected from historic cocktail books and in some cases using painstakingly recreated tinctures, liqueurs and bitters.

Here are some Prohibition-era cocktail recipes from one of the gins that was actually around in the 1920s – Tanqueray.

The Franklin

  • 1.5oz Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • 1tbsp dry vermouth
  • 2tbsp olive juice
  • 2 olives

Preparation: Fill a mixer with all ingredients including the olives. Cover and shake hard 3 – 4 times. Strain contents of the mixer into the cocktail glass. Garnish with an olive.

The Franklin, a dirty martini, is the drink that brought it all back and the cocktail that FDR celebrated the repeal of Prohibition with.

White Lady

Preparation: Pour all of the ingredients into a shaker, fill with ice, shake and strain into a chilled a coupe glass.

Introduced in the late 20’s, The White Lady was born from a drink named “Delilah,” which included crème de menthe. The Savoy’s Harry Craddock replaced it with orange liqueur and it became an instant classic.

Gin Buck

  • 1.5oz Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • 4oz ginger ale
  • .5 lemon juice
  • ½ of the shell of a lemon

Preparation: Squeeze lemon or lime juice into a collins glass and add the juiced shell of the lemon. Add ice and the Tanqueray. Top with ginger ale.

A relatively forgotten drink from the 20’s, this classic gin cocktail offers a taste that’s refreshing and light.

Southside Fizz

  • 1.5oz Tanqueray London Dry Gin
  • 3/4oz fresh lemon juice
  • 0.5oz simple syrup
  • 8–10 mint leaves
  • club soda

Preparation: Place mint leaves in cocktail shaker and gently bruise with muddler. Add gin, lemon juice and sugar, and stir to dissolve. Fill shaker with large pieces of ice and shake gently for 10 seconds. Double-strain into a highball glass filled with ice. Top with chilled club soda.

The Southside Fizz is the signature drink at the 21 Club, a historic and notorious speakeasy during Prohibition that still has the hidden secret passageway to the wine cellar under the adjoining building where all the illicit alcohol was hidden.


Toast to Repeal Day With These Classic Cocktails

On December 5th, 1933, the U.S. government undid a terrible civil injustice and issued the 21st Amendment to the Constitution allowing our great country to partake in one of our favorite pastimes – booze!

This put an end to the 18th Amendment and Prohibition aka the darkest days of our country, well at least to date. The initial logic was that prohibition would end alcoholism and crime, nope, didn’t work. As we all know, this gave rise to illegal bootlegging and underground speakeasies which also created a huge financial opportunity for gangsters like Al Capone and Lucky Luciano.

As many gang dominance and violent crime rose during this time, this support for this “noble experiment” waned and the allure of the government creating production jobs and tax revenue on a legal booze industry was very tempting during The Great Depression. In early 1933, Congress adopted a resolution proposing a 21st Amendment to the Constitution that would repeal the 18th. It was ratified by the end of that year, bringing the Prohibition era to a close and allowing our great country to drink again!

As gin was very popular during Prohibition, because it was relatively it was the easiest to produce homemade “bathtub gin” for bootleggers.

Here are 3 popular gin cocktails from that time to enjoy on Repeal Day


Celebrate Repeal Day with Old Fashioneds and more prohibition-era cocktails

Eighty-one years ago on Dec. 5 the 21st Amendment was ratified, marking the end of a nationwide prohibition on the sale of alcohol in the United States. That meant that after nearly 13 years, Americans could drink again — legally.

The era of prohibition was marked by a rise in organized crime, as gangsters like Al Capone built their fortunes on controlling the illegal sales of liquor. Cocktails, while having originated in the 1800s, became much more popular and innovative during prohibition as many were created to mask the taste of poor quality homemade liquors.

Nowadays, those same cocktails are replicated with smoother, tastier spirits for refreshing aperitifs and more. For one day only, these prohibition era concotions can be purchased from your favorite bartender for less than $1 at several Los Angeles area hot spots (and even as little as 5 cents at Melrose Umbrella Co. at 7465 Melrose Ave.). Or you can save yourself the trip and stir things up at home tonight (and every other night you feel like toasting to the godfathers of booze).

Cheers to the national holiday known as Repeal Day with these cocktails:

Old Fashioned

There are many slightly different recipes and techniques for making this cocktail, but it is basically composed of whiskey, Angostura bitters, sugar and an orange peel. Some recipes call for a splash of club soda and maraschino cherry as a garnish, while others suggest you should muddle the cherry, bitters and sugar together.

Personally, I prefer this preparation:

1 sugar cube or simple syrup

3 dashes of Angostura Bitters

Place the sugar cube, maraschino cherry and bitters in a glass and muddle them together. Pour in the rye whiskey and stir.

Once the sugar is dissolved, twist and squeeze the orange peel over the glass to release the citrus oils and add it to the cocktail. Add ice and if you prefer less of a bite.

Top with club soda and stir once more.

The Mary Pickford

This drink is named after the legendary 1920s movie starlett Mary Pickford, co-founder of the film studio United Artist and one of the original founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The cocktail is believed to have been created for her when she visited the Hotel Nacional de Cuba with actors Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks.

It is a simple cocktail to make, but very delicious. If you may have trouble finding maraschino liquor, you can substitute it by using a bit of the syrup from a jar of maraschino cherries.

1 ounce of pineapple juice

Splash of Maraschino liquor

Mix the ingredients in a shaker with ice. Strain and serve in a chilled martini glass and garnish with a cherry.

12-Mile Limit

This cocktail is named for the restriction during prohibition that banned the transportation and sale of alcohol within 12 miles off the coast of the United States.

This drink is serious business and is reminiscent of the island-inspired tiki drinks that came many years later.

1/2 ounce of fresh lemon juice

Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and shake until chilled. Strain over ice into a cocktail glass and top with a lemon twist.

The Bronx

Gin was a popular spirit during prohibition as it did not require aging and you could technically ferment and distill it all in your home bathtub — hence the name �thtub gin” that described many homemade spirits during the prohibition.

As you can imagine, �thtub gin” on its own was rough so this cocktail became very popular during this period as it was better at masking the harsh tasting homemade gin.

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and shake until chilled. Strain into a chilled glass and garnish.

Chris Peterson is a Long Beach-based freelance photographer and writer. He also contributes to the Food. Drink. Think. blog.


Historical Mixology: The American Cocktail Through Time With Derek Brown

Join cocktail expert and award-winning author Derek Brown for an exploration of the American cocktail, using mixology and anthropology to unearth the histories distilled in a drink. In this course, we’ll trace the cocktail from its origins to the present day—exploring how cocktails have evolved to not only meet the place and time they’re born into, but also to exist as a record of that history. Over the course of four weeks, we’ll cover everything from distillation in the Americas to mindful mixology (low- or no-ABV cocktails) in the age of COVID—hearing from guest writers, bartenders, and distillers along the way. Each session will zoom in on the history, recipes, and techniques of two drinks, which you’ll be encouraged to make alongside Derek during class.

This course is for home mixologists, amateur historians and anthropologists, and anyone interested in understanding the role of drinking and drinks in U.S. history and culture. Participants must be of legal drinking age to enroll in this course.

Gastro Obscura Courses: delving deep into the world’s culinary curiosities with expert instructors.

There are four total sessions included in this purchase, each lasting for 1.5 hours on four consecutive Thursdays beginning May 6.

Session 1 (5/6, 7:30–9 PM ET): The Birth of the Cocktail - Fish House Punch + Old Fashioned

Session 2 (5/13, 7:30–9 PM ET ): The Golden Age of Cocktails - Dry Martini + Daiquiri

Session 3 (5/20, 7:30–9 PM ET): Prohibition and its Aftermath - Scofflaw + Thompson’s Egg Phosphate

Session 4 (5/27, 7:30–9 PM ET): The Platinum Age and Beyond - Oaxacan Old Fashioned + The Getaway

Outside of class, students will be encouraged to read articles and practice techniques used in class with an independent cocktail project. Recipes and shopping lists will be sent out in advance of each class.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR, DEREK BROWN

A native Washingtonian with deep ties to the city, Derek Brown is a leading spirits and cocktail expert best known for his work at Washington, D.C.’s 2017 Spirited Award-winning "Best American Cocktail Bar," Columbia Room. He is the author of Spirits, Sugar, Water, Bitters: How the Cocktail Conquered the World —which earned him "Author of the Year" at the 2020 Nightclub & Bar Show Awards—and a forthcoming book on no- and low- alcohol cocktails, Mindful Mixology: A Comprehensive Guide to No- And Low-Alcohol Cocktails with 60 Recipes , slated for release January 2022.

Derek’s passion for spirits and cocktails has taken him across the globe where he’s learned about the integral role food and drink play in culture, customs, and values of communities worldwide. He’s written about drinks and drinking for The Atlantic, The Washington Post , and Vox , among other publications. You can follow him on Instagram (@drinkcompany) and Twitter (@ideasimprove).

This lecture series is designed so students can participate live or watch a recording after each session airs. Sessions will take place live over Zoom, with dedicated Q&A segments for students to ask questions via video or chat. Within 72 hours after each session airs, we will email all enrolled students a recording of the session, which they can watch using a temporary password for up to two weeks after the course concludes.

In most cases, instructors will use Google Classroom to communicate with students outside of class. While students aren’t required to use Google Classroom, instructors will be using this platform to post resources, discussion questions, and assignments, when applicable.

Students will be provided a list of supplies they can purchase to make drinks, including tools, spirits, and grocery items. They can buy as little or as much as they’d like, depending on how much they want to participate on a practical level.

Once registered, you’ll receive a confirmation email from Eventbrite that will provide access to each class meeting. Please save the confirmation email as you’ll use it to access your course via Zoom on each scheduled date and time.

We currently offer tiered ticket pricing in an effort to increase accessibility for all students, regardless of economic situation. Our lecture series are available at three ticket prices, with a limited number of no-pay spots available for students who could not otherwise participate. This model is intended to support a wider range of students as well as our instructors. To learn more about our tiered sliding scale pricing model, please visit our FAQ page.

We provide closed captioning for all of our courses, as well as transcripts upon request. Please reach out to us at [email protected] if you have any questions, requests, or access needs.

ATLAS OBSCURA ONLINE COURSES

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Our online courses offer opportunities for participants to emerge with new skills, knowledge, connections, and perspectives through multi-session classes designed and taught by expert instructors. Courses can take one of two forms: Seminars are intimate, interactive classes—capped at nine to 25 students—exploring topics and crafts through discussion, workshops, assignments, and in-class activities. We also offer lecture series that can be attended live, or viewed via a recording that will be shared within 72 hours after each session airs. Class recordings for lecture series will be available with a temporary password for up to two weeks following the final session of the course.


I have become a bit obsessed with Prohibition. I just finished a great book called When The Rivers Ran Red, which chronicled Prohibition in Sonoma County and the impact that it had on the winemakers and the wine industry. I rejoiced along with the winemakers with the Repeal of Prohibition. We thought that we would throw a discussion of Repeal Day into the mix to make sure that everyone knew Prohibition ultimately had a happy ending after many years of misery. Repeal Day is celebrated around the United States every year and each year, the celebration grows. For Repeal Day 2011, DOTW took to the road and journeyed across the country to spend it with our friends at the Left Coast Bartenders Guild in Tampa Bay, Florida.

The folks in Tampa threw one helluva party and made some truly amazing drinks. The Repeal Day Soiree was held at the historic Don Vicente Inn with party goers attired in 1920’s and 1930’s attire. If I didn’t know better, I could have truly thought that I stepped back in time. The folks at the Left Coast Bartender’s Guild divided the Don Vicente into periods, starting with drinks popular before Prohibition in the basement (and made some amazing syrups for those drinks from original recipes). The party goer then ventured to the ground level where Prohibition era cocktails were being served. If you could make it past the bottom and first floor to the second floor, you had the punch room (my personal fave), the patio that payed homage to the drinks of Cuba and different tasting rooms serving more modern tipples.

It was truly heartening to see the incredible cocktails being whipped up in Tampa. While we have been spoiled living in San Francisco, it’s clear that the cocktail renaissance is spreading across the country and is alive and well in Tampa. Hopefully our friends in Tampa will throw another Repeal Day Party next year. In the meantime, if you go to Tampa, try some drinks at Ciro’s, SideBern’s (or the original Burns Steakhouse, which looked like they were whipping up some pretty mean cocktails) and Fly Bar (sister to the Fly Bar in San Francisco).



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