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Hot Dogs and Beer Are Bad for You, Study Reveals

Hot Dogs and Beer Are Bad for You, Study Reveals



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According to this investigation, 2 drinks is your healthy maximum

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Red meat also had some adverse side effects.

A new report issued by the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund reveals a shocking turn of events — eating an excess of processed meats and drinking lots of beer might not be good for your health.

Specifically, the report investigated colorectal cancer. Consumption of red meats and pork also had an impact on disease risk.

“Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers,” says Edward L. Giovannucci, a professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the lead author of the report. “This report demonstrates there is a lot people can do to dramatically lower their risk.”

Among the actions people could take to reduce their risk of colorectal cancer was eating three servings of whole grains daily — the simple swap reduced risk by up to 17 percent. Additionally, physical activity, adequate consumption of fiber, and limiting processed and red meat proved to be effective.

None of these health recommendations sound new; and that’s because they’re not. “Many of the ways to help prevent colorectal cancer are important for overall health,” says Giovannucci. We’ve really known them to be important to your health for quite some time.

If you have been paying attention to health news at all, it’s likely you already know you should be limiting your daily meat and beer. Now, we just know it reduces this specific risk of cancer, too. Perhaps this study serves as just another insistent reminder of how we should protect ourselves from cancer with food.


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?


Foods You Should Really Avoid For High Cholesterol

It is very likely that you have heard a lot about cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. But did you know that you could reduce your cholesterol by making wise food choices? That is true! There are certain foods to reduce or even banish from your diet if you have high cholesterol. What are they? Are these high cholesterol foods like eggs, seafood like shrimps? Nope!

Dietary cholesterol is not detrimental to most people health

High cholesterol foods include eggs, animal brain, kidney and liver meat, seafood like calamari, lobster and shrimp. A lobster on a daily basis is not within the reach of all budgets, but this is not the case for eggs. Yet for nearly 50 years, nutritionists’ recommendations have been in favor of decreasing egg consumption on the pretext that eggs increase blood cholesterol and that it is bad for health. For example, in the USA egg consumption has declined steadily since the 1950s following repeated recommendations from experts in nutrition and metabolism.

This supposed adverse effect of dietary cholesterol dates back to 1961 when the American Heart Association (AHA) peremptorily stated that eggs were bad for the arteries. The arguments of the time were, if not slight, at least questionable, but the federal authorities issued the first recommendation on eggs. This decision was taken up by many Western countries.

But, after several decades of ban on foods high in cholesterol, the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after analysis of numerous recent worldwide scientific studies came to that there is not enough evidence on a quantitative dose of cholesterol from food that has an impact on blood cholesterol levels, removing the limit on dietary cholesterol in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The metabolism of cholesterol varies according to individuals and their state of health. There is a fraction of people that “manage” poorly the dietary cholesterol and enriches it in the blood in “bad” cholesterol forming small dense LDL. The cause of this sort of metabolic deviance is still largely unknown. What has been observed is that rabbits, for example, bear very much too much cholesterol whereas rats are very well suited to it… and in humans, this difference is probably of genetic origin.

If you have not a lipid metabolism disorder or are not genetically predisposed to hypercholesterolemia, you should not worry about eating cholesterol-rich foods. Then, what should you worry about? What to avoid?