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The Summer Shandy

The Summer Shandy



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What better way to kick off Memorial Day than with a refreshing beer cocktail? The Summer Shandy, made at New York City's Edi and the Wolf (an Austrian tavern), is both tart and fruity. The Radeberger pilsner is what gives the shandy its bold flavor; says Eduard Frauneder of Edi and the Wolf, "We love serving this drink at the restaurant; it’s light and refreshing, but still allows the flavors of Radeberger to shine."

Serve this cocktail with grilled veggies and seafood, or even with your heavier barbecue fare, like bratwurst. With a shandy in hand, it's hard not to toast Memorial Day.


Summer Shandy Clone Recipes?

First off, this batch is for the friends. I haven't been brewing for too long, but people have really enjoyed what I've produced so far. Now that spring break and summer are coming up, I have a lot of people requesting that I make a clone of Leinenkugel's Summer Shandy.

I was thinking that I should probably use an American Wheat beer or another light American style beer. I will be bottling this batch so force carbonating is not an option. I also want it to be pre-mixed at bottling so that people can't mess up the proportions and blame me (also because I don't want to bring a batch of lemonade around every time they want it). These are the possible routes I can take based on my current research:

1. Fully ferment the beer, add non-sugar lemonade mix packets to final product, add priming sugar, and bottle.
2. Ferment the beer with real lemonade (containing sugar) in the carboy, add priming sugar, and bottle.
3. Fully ferment the beer, add real lemonade (containing sugar) instead of priming sugar before bottling and bottle.

I'm sure that there are probably other options, so what do you suggest? I hope this will turn out to be a success, thanks for the help!

Unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector

Fatnoah

Well-Known Member

I tackled this issue last summer. I wrote up my experience in a thread. Hopefully, you can find it somewhat helpful.

High5apparatus

Well-Known Member

Unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Well-Known Member

High5apparatus

Well-Known Member

CDGoin

Well-Known Member

I added the lemon zest to the secondary (after boiling it in a cup of water for about 5 minutes)

My cream ale / braggot reciepe unintentionally turned into a sort of clone:

I think if you were to not add the Honey to the secondary.. and not dry hop as I did..

It would be almost dead on to the Summer Shandy.

Tacks

Well-Known Member

Unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector

Brew2

Well-Known Member

Unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector

FEH-Ringer

New Member

First off, this batch is for the friends. I haven't been brewing for too long, but people have really enjoyed what I've produced so far. Now that spring break and summer are coming up, I have a lot of people requesting that I make a clone of Leinenkugel's Summer Shandy.

I was thinking that I should probably use an American Wheat beer or another light American style beer. I will be bottling this batch so force carbonating is not an option. I also want it to be pre-mixed at bottling so that people can't mess up the proportions and blame me (also because I don't want to bring a batch of lemonade around every time they want it). These are the possible routes I can take based on my current research:

1. Fully ferment the beer, add non-sugar lemonade mix packets to final product, add priming sugar, and bottle.
2. Ferment the beer with real lemonade (containing sugar) in the carboy, add priming sugar, and bottle.
3. Fully ferment the beer, add real lemonade (containing sugar) instead of priming sugar before bottling and bottle.

I'm sure that there are probably other options, so what do you suggest? I hope this will turn out to be a success, thanks for the help!


When It's Hot Out, Don't Choose Between Beer and Lemonade—Drink a Shandy

Come summertime, New York City is a cesspool of heat, stink, and humidity, an unholy trinity that always makes me question why I moved to the sweltering metropolis.

Since I reside in a century-old Brooklyn apartment that lacks central air-conditioning, salvation often comes in the form of a bike, a beach, and multiple beers. The other weekend, with temperatures set to broil, I packed my backpack with frosty cans and pedaled to the Rockaways, where the cooling Atlantic waters were almost as invigorating as my first sip of Sixpoint RAD.

Blended with plenty of grapefruit juice, the wheat beer was a lovely dance of bitter, sweet, and sour, with a dainty alcohol content (just 3.2 percent) that made the sunny afternoon shine a bit brighter. I had two, then three, the RADs as revitalizing as Gatorade.

“It’s a beer, but it’s also a hydrating juice,” says Sixpoint founder Shane Welch.

In other words, it’s a shandy. Technically, of course, it’s not a shandy, but rather a radler—German for bicyclist. Whatever you call it, it’s one of the blended-beer drinks that have long been summertime mainstays across Europe, and are now invading America as well. In the States, shandies and radlers have largely flown under the radar. But as the growth of session beers has proven, there’s a burgeoning desire for flavorful low-alcohol brews. And that’s the sweet spot for radlers and shandies, no matter the refreshing reason for cracking one.

“The beer helps beat the bonk on long bike rides,” explains Christian Ettinger, the brewmaster-owner at Portland, Oregon’s Hopworks Urban Brewery. Since its opening day in 2008, HUB has sold the bracingly refreshing Totally Radler, a 50-50 mixture of house-made lemonade and Organic HUB Lager that’s become popular with local cyclists. (Makes sense: According to lore, the first radlers were served to bikers cruising along a path outside Munich.)

Lager is also the base for Sam Adams’s lemony radler variant, Porch Rocker, while Amstel uses lemon juice in its namesake Radler. On the other hand, Narragansett opted to make its shandy with tart lemon concentrate from frozen-drink purveyor Del’s, a longtime Rhode Island favorite. Released in May, Del’s Shandy proved so popular that the initial run sold out in one week. It’s testament to the shandy’s mass appeal, says Narragansett Beer CEO Mark Hellendrung. “We’re seeing people drinking the Del’s that haven’t had our lager or other craft styles, as well as people who would have otherwise ordered white wine or cocktails.”

Sour on lemons? Go for grapefruit. Minnesota-based Schell’s makes the marvelously quaffable Schell Shocked Grapefruit Radler, while Wisconsin’s Stevens Point packages the zingy Coast Radler. And this summer, the shandy-focused Traveler Beer Company rolled out the zippy Illusive Traveler. Brewed with wheat beer and gobs of fresh grapefruit, it’s anything but traditional.

“We’re American,” says Traveler founder Alan Newman. “We take any tradition we want and mess with it.” When Newman first tinkered with shandies more than 20 years ago, he couldn’t crack the right flavor combination. “We were thinking about how to mix lemon-lime soda and a lager,” says Newman, who previously founded Magic Hat. He shelved the idea until he had an epiphany: American IPAs don’t follow time-tested recipes. Why should a shandy? “I threw out the notion that we had to make a classic shandy,” says Newman, who also makes the lemon-limey Curious Traveler and strawberry-infused Time Traveler. “We’re opening the world of beer to a broader clientele.”

These blended drinks are also opening the eyes of beer geeks like myself. Look, I’ll never claim that the Amstel Radler is the world’s greatest beer. I was ready to hate it the second the sample arrived inside a massive plastic lemon. But after returning from a long, sweaty bike ride, I decided to crack a can. Weighing in at a wee 2 percent, the lemony beer disappeared in a blur, reviving my flagging energy. Right time. Right place. Right beer.

While shandies and radlers are poised to break big this season, with offerings from Mike’s Hard Lemonade and Shock Topcrowding store shelves, what happens when the leaves turn? “If you have a refreshing offering and it’s good, people can drink it all the time,” says Traveler’s Newman. “Refreshment is always in season.” To keep shandy sales rolling year-round, he’ll release the pumpkin-flavored Jack-O Traveler in fall, while wintertime will see Jolly Traveler. This fall, Leinenkugel, whose category-leadingSummer Shandyaccounts for more than 50 percent of company sales, will debut the Cranberry Ginger, Harvest Patch, and cocktail-inspired Old Fashioned Shandy.

Only time will tell if the shandy can solve the seasonal conundrum. For now, summer has arrived. And today is another scorcher. My bike, the beach, and another couple cans of RAD are beckoning.


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Unique Shandy Recipe || Super Shandy || Beer cocktail || Shandy || How to make Shandy

Shandy or a Radler is a beer mixed with a lemon or a lemon-lime flavored beverage. The citrus beverage, often called lemonade, may or may not be carbonated. The proportions of the two ingredients are adjusted to taste but are usually half lemonade and half beer..
But here we had tried to make this simple drink in a unique way, just addition of spiced infused vodka made it a “Super Shandy”..
**INGREDIENTS**.
Lager beer To top up.
Spiced Infused Vodka 60ml.
Lemonade 100ml.
Ice cubes 8-10.
Lemon for garnish.
Cheers!! ��☺️��.
Hope you will like it ��.
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DISCLAIMER:.
The channel does not sell, support or endorse any kind of alcoholic beverages. You must be of the legal drinking age to access the contents of this video. If you are subscribing or viewing any video of this channel you agree that you are above the required drinking age. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. The opinion being delivered in the video it’s personal. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favour of fair use..
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Dear Subscriber if u like the video please don’t forget to Like, Share, & Subscribe, if you have any suggestions please drop in the comment section, if you love to share your own Cocktail or Mocktails Recipes with me, please write a mail https://[email protected], Thanks for watching this video….. see you soon, Cheers!!
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HOW TO MAKE INFUSED VODKA WATCH VIDEO HERE:.
https://youtu.be/x1zY_4Br2Qc.
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#Shandy #supershandy #beercocktail #infusedvodka #dadabartender #cocktailsindia #tipsybartender #spirittales #cocktail #vodka #beer #howtomakeshandy #howtomakebeercocktail

Video taken from the channel: Spirit Tales


Taste test: Beat the heat with a summer shandy

It’s hot outside as I write this — well over 90 degrees, there’s not a cloud in the sky to spare folks some shade and the humidity is so high that even the men are having bad hair days.

When the heat of the summer begins to strangle my will to live, there’s only one thing I desire — a refreshing beer. I just happen to be sitting with five variations of one of the most refreshing kinds of beer out there — the shandy — which, according to trend predictors, is supposed to take over U.S. taste buds in 2013.

The word “shandy” comes from Britain, where it’s used to describe a broad variety of beers with lemonade or ginger ale or even berries mixed in. But in the U.S., the word is mostly reserved for beers that have been mixed with lemonade.

Let’s look a handful of these heat-beaters, starting with my personal benchmark.

Leinenkugel’s Summer Shandy, 4.2 percent ABV

Summer Shandy is a Weiss beer brewed with honey and then blended with natural lemonade flavor. It has zesty lemon on the nose, and treats your mouth to a dry and bubbly citrus blast upon the first sip, backed by just enough sweet malt to keep things from becoming a puckerfest. Dry, lemony and ultimately refreshing, this satisfying summer sipper chills you from the inside out.

Shock Top Lemon Shandy, 4.2 percent ABV

This lemony wheat beer is perfect for people who don’t like things that taste like, well, much of anything. It’s difficult to detect much lemon on the nose, and a sip provides an effervescent mouthful of watery beer, reminiscent of a Coors Light with a splash of lemon on board. While easy to drink in the summer heat, this beer lacks palate cleansing citrus bite I look for in a shandy.

Saranac Shandy, 4.2 percent ABV

Saranac takes a different tack with their shandy, starting with a crisp lager as the base beer, rather than a sweet and smooth wheat. The result is a beer with dank scents of lemon, and a thin malty flavor, which is followed by a gush of cloyingly sweet lemon, like that found inside one of those candy’s you always regretted accepting from your grandmother. While light and refreshing, I much prefer the dry crispness of Leinenkugel’s Summer Shandy to the sticky sweet afterglow this beer leaves behind.

Curious Traveler Shandy, 4.4 percent ABV

This shandy uses an ale as the base for the beer, blending in lemon and lime flavors to add a refreshing twist. There’s a ton of lemon peel on the nose, and the flavor does a lovely job of balancing a rich malt backbone and a sweet and earthy thread of lemon. There’s a lingering hop bitterness on this one that spoils the citrus in the finish, but overall, this is a well-executed and unique take on the style.

Homemade shandy

The recipe for a shandy is so simple even I can’t screw it up – one part lemonade, one part beer – preferably a wheat.

I decided to make my own, blending a Paulaner Hefe-Weizen and Sanpelligrino Limonata, a sparkling lemon soda (I went with a bubbly lemon soda for maximum refreshment, as it works much better than regular uncarbonated lemonade).

The result was fairly magical, with the broad earthy sweetness of the Paulaner still finding voice in the mix below the sweet and dry citrus bite of the lemon soda, and the mild hop and the lemony tang of the soda provided an interesting spicy interplay on the back end of the flavor. This combo was quite refreshing and satisfying in ways that the store-bought shandies can’t match.

All told, Leinenkugel’s Summer Shandy proved to be my clear-cut favorite amongst the premade beers, and the homemade shandy proved to be a revelation – I’ll definitely be making it again for guests.

Shandies aren’t the most complex or nuanced offerings in the world, but when the sweat is sliding down your back, there’s nothing quite as quenching as a sweet lemony treat.


Perfectly Refreshing Summertime Beer and Lemonade Shandy

Just because the Fourth of July has come and gone doesn’t mean that summertime is coming to an end. In fact, here in Cleveland, the weather has been sensational. Hot and sunny along with the bluest of skies that keep rolling in and I can’t get enough of it. If the summer heat has you yearning for a cool down, look no further than the classic refreshing Shandy cocktail.

The Perfect Summer Drink

The Shandy is a mix of beer and lemonade that pairs so well together you’ll be half tempted to open your very own lemonade stand. The summer mixture could have originated in Ireland, United Kingdom, or Germany depending on who you ask. No matter where it came from, we do know that it has since become known as a perfectly refreshing drink that hits all the right notes of summer. Depending on your preference, you can either serve this chilled or over the highest pile of ice. This concoction can be created utilizing any of your favorite brews and pairing it with Heinen’s Organic Lemonade. The beer options are endless, but usually, you can’t go wrong with something that is a lager.

Beers Made for a Shandy

  • Inexpensive Version – Michelob Ultra or Miller/Coors/Bud Light
  • Traditional Version – Harp Lager from Ireland
  • Craft Version – Founder’s Solid Gold Lager
  • Local Option – Market Garden NANO Lager

Heinen’s has an outstanding selection of beers to choose from. Get adventurous! An extensive selection of craft beers that you can set out to let your guests mix and match for their shandy. Although there are a number of different ways we could have made the shandy, we chose to go with the Stiegl Radler Lemon 4 Pack from Heinen’s to pair with their Organic Lemonade, and it was a total hit! This fruity, lemon forward lager has a very low alcohol content which allows you to mix your shandy with ¼ part lemonade, ¾ part lager.


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The Summer Shandy: 5 Perfect Hot Weather Thirst-Quenchers

It’s been a rainy, humid summer so far on the East Coast, so I’m wishing for several weeks of the 90-degree weather which causes me to crave one drink in particular: the shandy. It’s a beer cocktail made by mixing lemonade or soda with beer. Hear me out.

Even with so many great summer styles — session IPAs, sour ales and fruit beers — the shandy sticks out as the king of hot weather refreshment because of its low alcohol content, huge fruit juice punch and the fact that it does not taste like fruit punch. Althought shandies are just be catching on in the U.S. now, they’ve been popular in Europe for over a century. The traditional English version mixes ale with ginger beer, ginger ale or lemonade. The latter has become the most popular variation in the U.S.

Another popular take on the style is the German and Austrian radler, which mixes lemonade or grapefruit juice with local ale and is traditionally lighter and hoppier than the English versions. If you’re thinking about being adventurous and making your own, which you totally should, I’d advise using either kolsch or pilsner as the base beer. Light, crisp styles like these are perfect for cocktails because they mix well while still retaining plenty of beer flavor.

If you’re feeling inclined to go to the store instead of concocting it youself, you’re in luck. There’s never been a better time or selection than right now. While many traditional German and English brands export their own, there are plenty of great American craft examples to explore. Here are five of the most refreshing shandies out there for when that summer heatwave finally hits.


Summer Shandies: Several San Antonio Craft Brews Make Great Additions to Hot-Weather Beer Cocktails

It’s hard to think of a more refreshing summer quencher than beer, but going back, folks have found ways to give water, barley, hops and yeast an even more summery twist.

The shandygaff sprang forth in mid-19th century Germany as perhaps the first beer cocktail — a one-to-one mix of beer and ginger beer or ale. There’s evidence that a similar mix also evolved in the UK around the same time, and later versions were made with lemonade.

Whatever its origins, the name of this summery cooler was eventually shortened to the shandy, the name by which it’s known today.

Seasonal beers have long been a part of brewing evolution, and European brewers, sensing an opportunity, began bottling brews with the flavorings built in. These augmented beers were typically lower in alcohol and made for easy summertime drinking — a coupling that eventual production in cans only served to reinforce.

In one of those believe-it-or-not origin stories, Germany also gave birth to yet another summery beer concoction: the radlermass. Originally conceived as a cyclist’s quaff, this one was invented in 1922 by an innkeeper south of Munich whose establishment was on a bike trail he helped create.

One day, overwhelmed by the demands of thirsty cyclists, he added lemon soda to his beer to stretch the supply, and the rest is history. This term, too, was eventually shortened. It became the radler, and the line between it and the shandy eventually began to blur.

And now, here we are: in the grip of a serious summer. Never one to take the easy route when a complication can be had, I decided to return to the radlers and shandies of yore and mix my own from largely local ingredients.

During the course of my investigation, I mixed up a radler — with actual cycling associations — made with strictly San Antonio ingredients: Highwheel Betty, a German-style kolsch ale made by Dorcol Distilling & Brewing, and Limoncito, a lemon and lime soda produced by Southside Bottling Works. Tradition suggests six ounces of each in a tall glass, but I preferred seven ounces beer to the soda’s five. To play against Limoncito’s honey component, a squeeze of non-traditional lime doesn’t hurt either. It slips down at a peloton’s pace.

Grapefruit shandy-radler are also easy to knock back in the summer heat, and I found there are a couple of ways you can go here.

One is to dose your beer of choice with an equal part grapefruit soda. Fancy options include the bitter San Pellegrino version. Mexico’s Jarritos is fine, too. But to go totally local, make your own grapefruitade from Texas ruby reds and simple syrup.

Here’s how: Add one and a half ounces of fresh grapefruit juice to an ice-filled shaker, followed by an ounce of simple syrup and three ounces of water. Shake, strain into a pilsner glass and top off with beer. I asked Jason Davis of Freetail Brewing Co. and TJ Miller of Ranger Creek Brewing which local beers would make a good foil. Based on their suggestions, I selected the Freetail Bat Outta Helles Lager, but I would be equally happy with Ranger Creek’s San Antonio Lager. Yup, another squeeze of lime perked up the proceedings.

Inspired by the original shandygaff recipe, I looked for a different style of beer to go with a ginger brew I had on hand, the actually alcoholic — many aren’t — Crabbie’s Original Alcoholic Ginger Beer, a Scottish product. Your results, as they say, may vary, depending on which ginger beer or ale you use. And they may also vary if you choose Alamo Beer Co.’s Luna Blanca White, a Belgian-style wheat beer brewed with coriander and orange peel, over Ranger Creek’s Love-Struck Hefe, a German-style wheat beer. Either works well, and the recipe can be scaled up to work with a pitcher.

Add four ounces of ginger beer or ale to a tall, ice-filled rocks glass. Drop in a few lemon slices and mint sprigs and top with as much of a 12-ounce can of beer as fits. Finish the cocktail with a generous squeeze of lemon juice, and remember, like a michelada, you can add more beer as you drink.

Speaking of micheladas, I also played around with a shandy in the style of our neighbor to the south. That one took the form of the more rudimentary chelada — no tomato or other additions to get in the way. Simply add mix two ounces of lemon juice and a couple pinches of salt into a 12-ounce beer. I used Freetail’s Puro Pils for a puckery, San Anto vibe, but any of the above ales and lagers can be played with for a cross-cultural experience. For an even more puro product, add a little Tajin to the salted rim.

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Watch the video: The Front Bottoms: Summer Shandy OFFICIAL VIDEO