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Gray Hair Increases Heart Disease Risk More Than Obesity

Gray Hair Increases Heart Disease Risk More Than Obesity


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Early baldness and graying, like obesity, is probably genetic — and studies now show that it’s a greater risk factor for heart disease than having those extra pounds. The study, published by the European Society of Cardiology, assessed data from 2,000 men under 40. Men who were prematurely bald or gray were 5.6 times more likely to end up with heart disease than those with a full head of hair.

This mirrors similar results found in 2013, which showed that early baldness increased heart disease risk by 32 percent.

Obese persons are a little less than four times more likely than average-BMI persons to have heart disease. Underweight persons are twice as likely to develop heart disease, while being slightly overweight actually showed to be a protective factor against heart disease. This is all according to a study published in the European Heart Journal.

Is a “hair diet” next on America’s prescription? We know obesity is at an all-time high, but the percentage of America going gray has yet to be thoroughly assessed.

“This study suggests that identifying men with premature hair loss and greying may help identify those with an increased risk of developing heart disease,” said Dr. Mike Knapton, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation. Knapton warned not to devote too much concern to the study, as hair loss and graying isn’t something people can change.

Obesity might not be changeable either, however — no method, regimen, or diet has proven successful for the majority who attempt it in maintaining long-term weight loss. In fact, according to many studies, weight loss in the short-term (over 12 months) on almost any diet is minimal at best (averaging at less than 5 pounds) and the weight is often regained. One study showed that weight loss attempts were actually correlated with long-term weight gain rather than loss.

And even more recent evidence suggests that obesity has a genetic component, meaning that no matter a person’s lifestyle habits, their weight is largely predetermined.

Of early baldness, Knapton states, “This isn’t something that people can change, whereas you can modify your lifestyle and risk factors such as high cholesterol and blood pressure. These are far more important things to consider.” The same could be said for obese patients, as well — perhaps the answer lies in treating patients by prescribing healthy lifestyle changes, rather than risky methods of weight loss.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


9 New Discoveries About Fat That Will Clarify A Lot

One minute, you're drenching everything you eat in olive oil, the next you're filling your pantry with nothing but "fat-free" goodies. Figuring out fat is beyond confusing. and annoying. The great news: these 9 new fat facts are all you need to know to about choosing the right fats and navigating around the sketchy ones.

After a number of studies confirmed the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet&mdashwhich includes several sources of unsaturated fats&mdashtop academics are calling for change to the USDA recommendation to limit daily calories from fat. "The amount of total fat is irrelevant, and we shouldn't be using any numerical rule,&rdquo says Walter Willett, chair of the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. "But the type of fat is still relevant." Aim to get the majority of your fats from whole foods such as nuts, fish, avocado, high-fiber grains, and olive oil, à la the Mediterranean diet (rather than 100-calorie snack packs). (These 20 ridiculously healthy Mediterranean meals fit the bill perfectly.)

Namely, refined carbs and sugar (see this infographic of what sugar does to your body for proof). While you may want to limit certain saturated fats, it's no better to replace them with refined starch or sugar&mdashfor example, dropping butter in favor of jelly on your toast. It is helpful, on the other hand, to cut saturated fat if you replace it with unsaturated fat&mdashfor example, swapping butter with almond or peanut butter.

While saturated fat in moderate amounts is part of many healthy foods, such as olive oil and fish, trans fats should be avoided completely, Willett says. These artificial fats have no nutritional value and have been shown to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower "good" HDL cholesterol, as well as increase risks of heart disease and diabetes. Learn more about good fats and bad fats, here.

A Mediterranean-style diet rich in whole foods, especially vegetables, olive oil, nuts, seeds, fish, and whole grains, and low in processed foods, meats, and dairy, will cut your cravings for the bad stuff&mdashsaturated fat, refined starches, and sugar.

Okay, if you want to know for sure, you'll have to have an abdominal MRI, which can cost several hundred dollars. The next best thing: This quick test, courtesy of Pamela Peeke, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and author of Fight Fat After 40:

  • Lie flat on the floor and press your index fingers right above one side of your pelvic bone.
  • As you push down, tighten up your abdominal muscles.
  • Walk your index fingers across your abdominal muscle wall to your belly button: &ldquoit should feel nice and flat, like a stretched out piece of plastic,&rdquo says Peeke. If it sticks up, you&rsquove got visceral fat, which is pushing your ab muscles up.

White fat produces a hormone called adiponectin, which helps regulate insulin production. Thin people have small fat cells, which release more insulin-regulating adiponectin than the large fat cells that heavier people have. This is one of the reasons why being overweight can be bad for health. "When you gain weight and fat cells increase in size, they produce less adiponectin, which in turn raises risk of conditions like diabetes and heart disease," explains Louis Aronne, MD, director of the Obesity Clinic at Cornell.

Buuut, only 2 calories a day per pound of fat. Far preferable: muscle, which burns 6 calories a day per pound. Here are the 4 different types of body fat, explained.

Most people need more brown fat, finds recent research. Like muscle, this stuff burns calories even when you're at rest. And you can create additional stores of brown fat by exercising: Long bouts of aerobic exercise release the hormone iris in, which helps convert white fat into brown, according to one recent study. (Learn more about brown fat here.)

Women with waists over 37 inches have an 80% higher risk of conditions like heart disease, lung problems or cancer compared to women whose waist span was under 27 inches, according to a Mayo Clinic review published this past March. Every two-inch increase translated into a 9% increased mortality risk.


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Comments:

  1. Bryant

    have responded Quickly :)

  2. Mu'awiyah

    True to the sentence

  3. Machau

    What entertaining phrase

  4. Atsu

    I apologize, of course, but it doesn't quite suit me.



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